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os:
- linux

language:
- c

compiler:
- avr-gcc

env:
- KEYBOARD=alps64
- KEYBOARD=arrow_pad
- KEYBOARD=atomic
- KEYBOARD=atreus
- KEYBOARD=bantam44
- KEYBOARD=clueboard1
- KEYBOARD=clueboard2
- KEYBOARD=cluepad
- KEYBOARD=ergodox_ez
- KEYBOARD=gh60
- KEYBOARD=gh60_rev_c
- KEYBOARD=hhkb
- KEYBOARD=jd45
- KEYBOARD=kc60_v2
- KEYBOARD=planck
- KEYBOARD=preonic
- KEYBOARD=retro_refit

script:
- cd keyboard/$KEYBOARD && make

addons:
apt:
packages:
- avr-libc
- gcc-avr
- dfu-programmer

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- 0
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[![Build Status](https://travis-ci.org/jackhumbert/qmk_firmware.svg?branch=master)](https://travis-ci.org/jackhumbert/qmk_firmware)
# Quantum Mechanical Keyboard Firmware

This is a keyboard firmware based on the [tmk_keyboard firmware](http://github.com/tmk/tmk_keyboard) with some useful features for Atmel AVR controllers, and more specifically, the [OLKB product line](http://olkb.co), the [ErgoDox EZ](http://www.ergodox-ez.com) keyboard, and the [Clueboard product line](http://clueboard.co/).

QMK is developed and maintained by Jack Humbert of OLKB with contributions from the community, and of course, TMK. In fact, this repo used to be a fork of TMK, and we are incredibly grateful for his founding contributions to the firmware. We've had to break the fork due to purely technical reasons -- it simply became too different over time, and we've had to start refactoring some of the basic bits and pieces. We are huge fans of TMK, both the firmware and the person. :)

This documentation is edited and maintained by Erez Zukerman of ErgoDox EZ. If you spot any typos or inaccuracies, please [open an issue](https://github.com/jackhumbert/qmk_firmware/issues/new).

The OLKB product firmwares are maintained by Jack, the Ergodox EZ by Erez, and the Clueboard by [Zach White](https://github.com/skullydazed).

## Documentation roadmap

This is not a tiny project. While this is the main Readme, there are many other files you might want to consult. Here are some points of interest:

* The Readme for your own keyboard: This is found under `keyboards/<your keyboards's name>/`. So for the ErgoDox EZ, it's [here](keyboard/ergodox_ez/); for the Atomic, it's [here](keyboard/atomic/) and so on.
* The [build guide](doc/BUILD_GUIDE.md), also mentioned in the next section. This is how you put your development environment together so you can compile the firmware.
* The list of possible keycodes you can use in your keymap is actually spread out in a few different places:
* [tmk_core/common/keycode.h](tmk_core/common/keycode.h) - the base TMK keycodes. This is the actual source file.
* [doc/keycode.txt](doc/keycode.txt) - an explanation of those same keycodes.
* [quantum/keymap_common.h](quantum/keymap_common.h) - this is where the QMK-specific aliases are all set up. Things like the Hyper and Meh key, the Leader key, and all of the other QMK innovations. These are also explained and documented below, but `keymap_common.h` is where they're actually defined.
* The [TMK documentation](doc/TMK_README.md). QMK is based on TMK, and this explains how it works internally.

## Getting started

* [BUILD_GUIDE.md](doc/BUILD_GUIDE.md) contains instructions to set up a build environment, build the firmware, and deploy it to a keyboard. Once your build environment has been set up, all `make` commands to actually build the firmware must be run from a folder in `keyboard/`.
* If you're looking to customize a keyboard that currently runs QMK or TMK, find your keyboard's directory under `keyboard/` and run the make commands from there.
* If you're looking to apply this firmware to an entirely new hardware project (a new kind of keyboard), you can create your own Quantum-based project by using `util/new_project.sh <project_name>`, which will create `/keyboard/<project_name>` with all the necessary components for a Quantum project.

### Makefile Options

You have access to a bunch of goodies! Check out the Makefile to enable/disable some of the features. Uncomment the `#` to enable them. Setting them to `no` does nothing and will only confuse future you.

BACKLIGHT_ENABLE = yes # Enable keyboard backlight functionality
MIDI_ENABLE = yes # MIDI controls
UNICODE_ENABLE = no # <-- This is how you disable an option, just set it to "no"
BLUETOOTH_ENABLE = yes # Enable Bluetooth with the Adafruit EZ-Key HID

### Customizing Makefile options on a per-keymap basis

If your keymap directory has a file called `makefile.mk` (note the lowercase filename, and the `.mk` extension), any Makefile options you set in that file will take precedence over other Makefile options (those set for Quantum as a whole or for your particular keyboard).

So let's say your keyboard's makefile has `CONSOLE_ENABLE = yes` (or maybe doesn't even list the `CONSOLE_ENABLE` option, which would cause it to revert to the global Quantum default). You want your particular keymap to not have the debug console, so you make a file called `makefile.mk` and specify `CONSOLE_ENABLE = no`.

### Customizing config.h on a per-keymap basis

If you use the ErgoDox EZ, you can make a `config_user.h` file in your keymap directory and use it to override any `config.h` settings you don't like. Anything you set there will take precedence over the global `config.h` for the ErgoDox EZ. To see an example of this, check out `keymaps/erez_experimental`.

## Quick aliases to common actions

Your keymap can include shortcuts to common operations (called "function actions" in tmk).

### Switching and toggling layers

`MO(layer)` - momentary switch to *layer*. As soon as you let go of the key, the layer is deactivated and you pop back out to the previous layer. When you apply this to a key, that same key must be set as `KC_TRNS` on the destination layer. Otherwise, you won't make it back to the original layer when you release the key (and you'll get a keycode sent). You can only switch to layers *above* your current layer. If you're on layer 0 and you use `MO(1)`, that will switch to layer 1 just fine. But if you include `MO(3)` on layer 5, that won't do anything for you -- because layer 3 is lower than layer 5 on the stack.

`OSL(layer)` - momentary switch to *layer*, as a one-shot operation. So if you have a key that's defined as `OSL(1)`, and you tap that key, then only the very next keystroke would come from layer 1. You would drop back to layer zero immediately after that one keystroke. That's handy if you have a layer full of custom shortcuts -- for example, a dedicated key for closing a window. So you tap your one-shot layer mod, then tap that magic 'close window' key, and keep typing like a boss. Layer 1 would remain active as long as you hold that key down, too (so you can use it like a momentary toggle-layer key with extra powers).

`LT(layer, kc)` - momentary switch to *layer* when held, and *kc* when tapped. Like `MO()`, this only works upwards in the layer stack (`layer` must be higher than the current layer).

`TG(layer)` - toggles a layer on or off. As with `MO()`, you should set this key as `KC_TRNS` in the destination layer so that tapping it again actually toggles back to the original layer. Only works upwards in the layer stack.


### Fun with modifier keys

* `LSFT(kc)` - applies left Shift to *kc* (keycode) - `S(kc)` is an alias
* `RSFT(kc)` - applies right Shift to *kc*
* `LCTL(kc)` - applies left Control to *kc*
* `RCTL(kc)` - applies right Control to *kc*
* `LALT(kc)` - applies left Alt to *kc*
* `RALT(kc)` - applies right Alt to *kc*
* `LGUI(kc)` - applies left GUI (command/win) to *kc*
* `RGUI(kc)` - applies right GUI (command/win) to *kc*
* `HYPR(kc)` - applies Hyper (all modifiers) to *kc*
* `MEH(kc)` - applies Meh (all modifiers except Win/Cmd) to *kc*
* `LCAG(kc)` - applies CtrlAltGui to *kc*

You can also chain these, like this:

LALT(LCTL(KC_DEL)) -- this makes a key that sends Alt, Control, and Delete in a single keypress.

The following shortcuts automatically add `LSFT()` to keycodes to get commonly used symbols. Their long names are also available and documented in `/quantum/keymap_common.h`.

KC_TILD ~
KC_EXLM !
KC_AT @
KC_HASH #
KC_DLR $
KC_PERC %
KC_CIRC ^
KC_AMPR &
KC_ASTR *
KC_LPRN (
KC_RPRN )
KC_UNDS _
KC_PLUS +
KC_DQUO "
KC_LCBR {
KC_RCBR }
KC_LABK <
KC_RABK >
KC_PIPE |
KC_COLN :

`OSM(mod)` - this is a "one shot" modifier. So let's say you have your left Shift key defined as `OSM(MOD_LSFT)`. Tap it, let go, and Shift is "on" -- but only for the next character you'll type. So to write "The", you don't need to hold down Shift -- you tap it, tap t, and move on with life. And if you hold down the left Shift key, it just works as a left Shift key, as you would expect (so you could type THE). There's also a magical, secret way to "lock" a modifier by tapping it multiple times. If you want to learn more about that, open an issue. :)

`MT(mod, kc)` - is *mod* (modifier key - MOD_LCTL, MOD_LSFT) when held, and *kc* when tapped. In other words, you can have a key that sends Esc (or the letter O or whatever) when you tap it, but works as a Control key or a Shift key when you hold it down.

These are the values you can use for the `mod` in `MT()` and `OSM()` (right-hand modifiers are not available for `MT()`):

* MOD_LCTL
* MOD_LSFT
* MOD_LALT
* MOD_LGUI
* MOD_HYPR
* MOD_MEH


These can also be combined like `MOD_LCTL | MOD_LSFT` e.g. `MT(MOD_LCTL | MOD_LSFT, KC_ESC)` which would activate Control and Shift when held, and send Escape when tapped.

We've added shortcuts to make common modifier/tap (mod-tap) mappings more compact:

* `CTL_T(kc)` - is LCTL when held and *kc* when tapped
* `SFT_T(kc)` - is LSFT when held and *kc* when tapped
* `ALT_T(kc)` - is LALT when held and *kc* when tapped
* `GUI_T(kc)` - is LGUI when held and *kc* when tapped
* `ALL_T(kc)` - is Hyper (all mods) when held and *kc* when tapped. To read more about what you can do with a Hyper key, see [this blog post by Brett Terpstra](http://brettterpstra.com/2012/12/08/a-useful-caps-lock-key/)
* `LCAG_T(kc)` - is CtrlAltGui when held and *kc* when tapped
* `MEH_T(kc)` - is like Hyper, but not as cool -- does not include the Cmd/Win key, so just sends Alt+Ctrl+Shift.

### Space Cadet Shift: The future, built in

Steve Losh [described](http://stevelosh.com/blog/2012/10/a-modern-space-cadet/) the Space Cadet Shift quite well. Essentially, you hit the left Shift on its own, and you get an opening parenthesis; hit the right Shift on its own, and you get the closing one. When hit with other keys, the Shift key keeps working as it always does. Yes, it's as cool as it sounds.

To use it, use `KC_LSPO` (Left Shift, Parens Open) for your left Shift on your keymap, and `KC_RSPC` (Right Shift, Parens Close) for your right Shift.

The only other thing you're going to want to do is create a `makefile.mk` in your keymap directory and set the following:

```
COMMAND_ENABLE = no # Commands for debug and configuration
```

This is just to keep the keyboard from going into command mode when you hold both Shift keys at the same time.

### The Leader key: A new kind of modifier

If you've ever used Vim, you know what a Leader key is. If not, you're about to discover a wonderful concept. :) Instead of hitting Alt+Shift+W for example (holding down three keys at the same time), what if you could hit a _sequence_ of keys instead? So you'd hit our special modifier (the Leader key), followed by W and then C (just a rapid succession of keys), and something would happen.

That's what `KC_LEAD` does. Here's an example:

1. Pick a key on your keyboard you want to use as the Leader key. Assign it the keycode `KC_LEAD`. This key would be dedicated just for this -- it's a single action key, can't be used for anything else.
2. Include the line `#define LEADER_TIMEOUT 300` somewhere in your keymap.c file, probably near the top. The 300 there is 300ms -- that's how long you have for the sequence of keys following the leader. You can tweak this value for comfort, of course.
3. Within your `matrix_scan_user` function, do something like this:

```
void matrix_scan_user(void) {
LEADER_DICTIONARY() {
leading = false;
leader_end();

SEQ_ONE_KEY(KC_F) {
register_code(KC_S);
unregister_code(KC_S);
}
SEQ_TWO_KEYS(KC_A, KC_S) {
register_code(KC_H);
unregister_code(KC_H);
}
SEQ_THREE_KEYS(KC_A, KC_S, KC_D) {
register_code(KC_LGUI);
register_code(KC_S);
unregister_code(KC_S);
unregister_code(KC_LGUI);
}
}
}
```

As you can see, you have three function. you can use - `SEQ_ONE_KEY` for single-key sequences (Leader followed by just one key), and `SEQ_TWO_KEYS` and `SEQ_THREE_.EYS` for longer sequences. Each of these accepts one or more keycodes as arguments. This is an important point: You can use keycodes from **any layer on your keyboard**. That layer would need to be active for the leader macro to fire, obviously.

### Temporarily setting the default layer

`DF(layer)` - sets default layer to *layer*. The default layer is the one at the "bottom" of the layer stack - the ultimate fallback layer. This currently does not persist over power loss. When you plug the keyboard back in, layer 0 will always be the default. It is theoretically possible to work around that, but that's not what `DF` does.

### Prevent stuck modifiers

Consider the following scenario:

1. Layer 0 has a key defined as Shift.
2. The same key is defined on layer 1 as the letter A.
3. User presses Shift.
4. User switches to layer 1 for whatever reason.
5. User releases Shift, or rather the letter A.
6. User switches back to layer 0.

Shift was actually never released and is still considered pressed.

If such situation bothers you add this to your `config.h`:

#define PREVENT_STUCK_MODIFIERS

This option uses 5 bytes of memory per every 8 keys on the keyboard
rounded up (5 bits per key). For example on Planck (48 keys) it uses
(48/8)\*5 = 30 bytes.

### Remember: These are just aliases

These functions work the same way that their `ACTION_*` functions do - they're just quick aliases. To dig into all of the tmk ACTION_* functions, please see the [TMK documentation](https://github.com/jackhumbert/qmk_firmware/blob/master/doc/keymap.md#2-action).

Instead of using `FNx` when defining `ACTION_*` functions, you can use `F(x)` - the benefit here is being able to use more than 32 function actions (up to 4096), if you happen to need them.

## Macro shortcuts: Send a whole string when pressing just one key

Instead of using the `ACTION_MACRO` function, you can simply use `M(n)` to access macro *n* - *n* will get passed into the `action_get_macro` as the `id`, and you can use a switch statement to trigger it. This gets called on the keydown and keyup, so you'll need to use an if statement testing `record->event.pressed` (see keymap_default.c).

```c
const macro_t *action_get_macro(keyrecord_t *record, uint8_t id, uint8_t opt) // this is the function signature -- just copy/paste it into your keymap file as it is.
{
switch(id) {
case 0: // this would trigger when you hit a key mapped as M(0)
if (record->event.pressed) {
return MACRO( I(255), T(H), T(E), T(L), T(L), W(255), T(O), END ); // this sends the string 'hello' when the macro executes
}
break;
}
return MACRO_NONE;
};
```
A macro can include the following commands:

* I() change interval of stroke in milliseconds.
* D() press key.
* U() release key.
* T() type key(press and release).
* W() wait (milliseconds).
* END end mark.

So above you can see the stroke interval changed to 255ms between each keystroke, then a bunch of keys being typed, waits a while, then the macro ends.

Note: Using macros to have your keyboard send passwords for you is possible, but a bad idea.

### Advanced macro functions

To get more control over the keys/actions your keyboard takes, the following functions are available to you in the `action_get_macro` function block:

* `record->event.pressed`

This is a boolean value that can be tested to see if the switch is being pressed or released. An example of this is

```c
if (record->event.pressed) {
// on keydown
} else {
// on keyup
}
```

* `register_code(<kc>);`

This sends the `<kc>` keydown event to the computer. Some examples would be `KC_ESC`, `KC_C`, `KC_4`, and even modifiers such as `KC_LSFT` and `KC_LGUI`.

* `unregister_code(<kc>);`

Parallel to `register_code` function, this sends the `<kc>` keyup event to the computer. If you don't use this, the key will be held down until it's sent.

* `layer_on(<n>);`

This will turn on the layer `<n>` - the higher layer number will always take priority. Make sure you have `KC_TRNS` for the key you're pressing on the layer you're switching to, or you'll get stick there unless you have another plan.

* `layer_off(<n>);`

This will turn off the layer `<n>`.

* `clear_keyboard();`

This will clear all mods and keys currently pressed.

* `clear_mods();`

This will clear all mods currently pressed.

* `clear_keyboard_but_mods();`

This will clear all keys besides the mods currently pressed.

* `update_tri_layer(layer_1, layer_2, layer_3);`

If the user attempts to activate layer 1 AND layer 2 at the same time (for example, by hitting their respective layer keys), layer 3 will be activated. Layers 1 and 2 will _also_ be activated, for the purposes of fallbacks (so a given key will fall back from 3 to 2, to 1 -- and only then to 0).

#### Naming your macros

If you have a bunch of macros you want to refer to from your keymap, while keeping the keymap easily readable, you can just name them like so:

```
#define AUD_OFF M(6)
#define AUD_ON M(7)
#define MUS_OFF M(8)
#define MUS_ON M(9)
#define VC_IN M(10)
#define VC_DE M(11)
#define PLOVER M(12)
#define EXT_PLV M(13)
```

As was done on the [Planck default keymap](/keyboard/planck/keymaps/default/keymap.c#L33-L40)

#### Timer functionality

It's possible to start timers and read values for time-specific events - here's an example:

```c
static uint16_t key_timer;
key_timer = timer_read();
if (timer_elapsed(key_timer) < 100) {
// do something if less than 100ms have passed
} else {
// do something if 100ms or more have passed
}
```

It's best to declare the `static uint16_t key_timer;` outside of the macro block (top of file, etc).

#### Example: Single-key copy/paste (hold to copy, tap to paste)

With QMK, it's easy to make one key do two things, as long as one of those things is being a modifier. :) So if you want a key to act as Ctrl when held and send the letter R when tapped, that's easy: `CTL_T(KC_R)`. But what do you do when you want that key to send Ctrl-V (paste) when tapped, and Ctrl-C (copy) when held?

Here's what you do:


```
static uint16_t key_timer;

const macro_t *action_get_macro(keyrecord_t *record, uint8_t id, uint8_t opt)
{
switch(id) {
case 0: {
if (record->event.pressed) {
key_timer = timer_read(); // if the key is being pressed, we start the timer.
}
else { // this means the key was just released, so we can figure out how long it was pressed for (tap or "held down").
if (timer_elapsed(key_timer) > 150) { // 150 being 150ms, the threshhold we pick for counting something as a tap.
return MACRO( D(LCTL), T(C), U(LCTL), END );
}
else {
return MACRO( D(LCTL), T(V), U(LCTL), END );
}
}
break;
}
}
return MACRO_NONE;
};
```

And then, to assign this macro to a key on your keyboard layout, you just use `M(0)` on the key you want to press for copy/paste.

## Additional keycode aliases for software-implemented layouts (Colemak, Dvorak, etc)

Everything is assuming you're in Qwerty (in software) by default, but there is built-in support for using a Colemak or Dvorak layout by including this at the top of your keymap:

#include <keymap_colemak.h>

If you use Dvorak, use `keymap_dvorak.h` instead of `keymap_colemak.h` for this line. After including this line, you will get access to:

* `CM_*` for all of the Colemak-equivalent characters
* `DV_*` for all of the Dvorak-equivalent characters

These implementations assume you're using Colemak or Dvorak on your OS, not on your keyboard - this is referred to as a software-implemented layout. If your computer is in Qwerty and your keymap is in Colemak or Dvorak, this is referred to as a firmware-implemented layout, and you won't need these features.

To give an example, if you're using software-implemented Colemak, and want to get an `F`, you would use `CM_F` - `KC_F` under these same circumstances would result in `T`.

## Additional language support

In `quantum/keymap_extras/`, you'll see various language files - these work the same way as the alternative layout ones do. Most are defined by their two letter country/language code followed by an underscore and a 4-letter abbreviation of its name. `FR_UGRV` which will result in a `ù` when using a software-implemented AZERTY layout. It's currently difficult to send such characters in just the firmware (but it's being worked on - see Unicode support).

## Unicode support

You can currently send 4 hex digits with your OS-specific modifier key (RALT for OSX with the "Unicode Hex Input" layout) - this is currently limited to supporting one OS at a time, and requires a recompile for switching. 8 digit hex codes are being worked on. The keycode function is `UC(n)`, where *n* is a 4 digit hexidecimal. Enable from the Makefile.

## Other firmware shortcut keycodes

* `RESET` - puts the MCU in DFU mode for flashing new firmware (with `make dfu`)
* `DEBUG` - the firmware into debug mode - you'll need hid_listen to see things
* `BL_ON` - turns the backlight on
* `BL_OFF` - turns the backlight off
* `BL_<n>` - sets the backlight to level *n*
* `BL_INC` - increments the backlight level by one
* `BL_DEC` - decrements the backlight level by one
* `BL_TOGG` - toggles the backlight
* `BL_STEP` - steps through the backlight levels

Enable the backlight from the Makefile.

## Driving a speaker - audio support

Your keyboard can make sounds! If you've got a Planck, Preonic, or basically any keyboard that allows access to the C6 port, you can hook up a simple speaker and have it beep. You can use those beeps to indicate layer transitions, modifiers, special keys, or just to play some funky 8bit tunes.

The audio code lives in [quantum/audio/audio.h](/quantum/audio/audio.h) and in the other files in the audio directory. It's enabled by default on the Planck [stock keymap](/keyboard/planck/keymaps/default/keymap.c). Here are the important bits:

```
#include "audio.h"
```

Then, lower down the file:

```
float tone_startup[][2] = {
ED_NOTE(_E7 ),
E__NOTE(_CS7),
E__NOTE(_E6 ),
E__NOTE(_A6 ),
M__NOTE(_CS7, 20)
};
```

This is how you write a song. Each of these lines is a note, so we have a little ditty composed of five notes here.

Then, we have this chunk:

```
float tone_qwerty[][2] = SONG(QWERTY_SOUND);
float tone_dvorak[][2] = SONG(DVORAK_SOUND);
float tone_colemak[][2] = SONG(COLEMAK_SOUND);
float tone_plover[][2] = SONG(PLOVER_SOUND);
float tone_plover_gb[][2] = SONG(PLOVER_GOODBYE_SOUND);

float music_scale[][2] = SONG(MUSIC_SCALE_SOUND);
float goodbye[][2] = SONG(GOODBYE_SOUND);
```

Wherein we bind predefined songs (from [audio/song_list.h](/audio/song_list.h)) into named variables. This is one optimization that helps save on memory: These songs only take up memory when you reference them in your keymap, because they're essentially all preprocessor directives.

So now you have something called `tone_plover` for example. How do you make it play the Plover tune, then? If you look further down the keymap, you'll see this:

```
PLAY_NOTE_ARRAY(tone_plover, false, 0); // Signature is: Song name, repeat, rest style
```

This is inside one of the macros. So when that macro executes, your keyboard plays that particular chime.

"Rest style" in the method signature above (the last parameter) specifies if there's a rest (a moment of silence) between the notes.

## MIDI functionalty

This is still a WIP, but check out `quantum/keymap_midi.c` to see what's happening. Enable from the Makefile.

## Bluetooth functionality

This requires [some hardware changes](https://www.reddit.com/r/MechanicalKeyboards/comments/3psx0q/the_planck_keyboard_with_bluetooth_guide_and/?ref=search_posts), but can be enabled via the Makefile. The firmware will still output characters via USB, so be aware of this when charging via a computer. It would make sense to have a switch on the Bluefruit to turn it off at will.

## International Characters on Windows

[AutoHotkey](https://autohotkey.com) allows Windows users to create custom hotkeys among others.

The method does not require Unicode support in the keyboard itself but depends instead of AutoHotkey running in the background.

First you need to select a modifier combination that is not in use by any of your programs.
CtrlAltWin is not used very widely and should therefore be perfect for this.
There is a macro defined for a mod-tab combo `LCAG_T`.
Add this mod-tab combo to a key on your keyboard, e.g.: `LCAG_T(KC_TAB)`.
This makes the key behave like a tab key if pressed and released immediately but changes it to the modifier if used with another key.

In the default script of AutoHotkey you can define custom hotkeys.

<^<!<#a::Send, ä
<^<!<#<+a::Send, Ä

The hotkeys above are for the combination CtrlAltGui and CtrlAltGuiShift plus the letter a.
AutoHotkey inserts the Text right of `Send, ` when this combination is pressed.

## RGB Under Glow Mod

![Planck with RGB Underglow](https://raw.githubusercontent.com/yangliu/qmk_firmware/planck-rgb/keyboard/planck/keymaps/yang/planck-with-rgb-underglow.jpg)

Here is a quick demo on Youtube (with NPKC KC60) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKrpPAHlisY).

For this mod, you need an unused pin wiring to DI of WS2812 strip. After wiring the VCC, GND, and DI, you can enable the underglow in your Makefile.

RGBLIGHT_ENABLE = yes

Please note that the underglow is not compatible with audio output. So you cannot enable both of them at the same time.

Please add the following options into your config.h, and set them up according your hardware configuration. These settings are for the F4 by default:

#define ws2812_PORTREG PORTF
#define ws2812_DDRREG DDRF
#define ws2812_pin PF4
#define RGBLED_NUM 14 // Number of LEDs
#define RGBLIGHT_HUE_STEP 10
#define RGBLIGHT_SAT_STEP 17
#define RGBLIGHT_VAL_STEP 17

You'll need to edit `PORTF`, `DDRF`, and `PF4` on the first three lines to the port/pin you have your LED(s) wired to, eg for B3 change things to:

#define ws2812_PORTREG PORTB
#define ws2812_DDRREG DDRB
#define ws2812_pin PB3

The firmware supports 5 different light effects, and the color (hue, saturation, brightness) can be customized in most effects. To control the underglow, you need to modify your keymap file to assign those functions to some keys/key combinations. For details, please check this keymap. `keyboard/planck/keymaps/yang/keymap.c`

### WS2812 Wiring

![WS2812 Wiring](https://raw.githubusercontent.com/yangliu/qmk_firmware/planck-rgb/keyboard/planck/keymaps/yang/WS2812-wiring.jpg)

Please note the USB port can only supply a limited amount of power to the keyboard (500mA by standard, however, modern computer and most usb hubs can provide 700+mA.). According to the data of NeoPixel from Adafruit, 30 WS2812 LEDs require a 5V 1A power supply, LEDs used in this mod should not more than 20.

## Safety Considerations

You probably don't want to "brick" your keyboard, making it impossible
to rewrite firmware onto it. Here are some of the parameters to show
what things are (and likely aren't) too risky.

- If a keyboard map does not include RESET, then, to get into DFU
mode, you will need to press the reset button on the PCB, which
requires unscrewing some bits.
- Messing with tmk_core / common files might make the keyboard
inoperable
- Too large a .hex file is trouble; `make dfu` will erase the block,
test the size (oops, wrong order!), which errors out, failing to
flash the keyboard
- DFU tools do /not/ allow you to write into the bootloader (unless
you throw in extra fruitsalad of options), so there is little risk
there.
- EEPROM has around a 100000 write cycle. You shouldn't rewrite the
firmware repeatedly and continually; that'll burn the EEPROM
eventually.


+ 88
- 0
Vagrantfile View File

@@ -0,0 +1,88 @@
# -*- mode: ruby -*-
# vi: set ft=ruby :

Vagrant.configure(2) do |config|
# You can only have one config.vm.box uncommented at a time

# Comment this and uncomment another if you don't want to use the minimal Arch box
config.vm.box = "dragon788/arch-ala-elasticdog"

# VMware/Virtualbox 64 bit
# config.vm.box = "phusion/ubuntu-14.04-amd64"
#
# VMware/Virtualbox 64 bit
#config.vm.box = "puphpet/centos65-x64"
#
# The opensuse boxes don't have dfu-util in their default repositories
#
# The virtualbox version has tools issues
# VMware/Virtualbox 64 bit
#config.vm.box = "bento/opensuse-13.2-x86_64"
#
# Virtualbox only
#config.vm.box = "bento/opensuse-13.2-i386"
# config.vm.box = ""
# config.vm.box = ""

# This section allows you to customize the Virtualbox VM
# settings, ie showing the GUI or upping the memory
# or cores if desired
config.vm.provider "virtualbox" do |vb|
# Hide the VirtualBox GUI when booting the machine
vb.gui = false
# Uncomment the below lines if you want to program
# your Teensy via the VM rather than your host OS
#vb.customize ['modifyvm', :id, '--usb', 'on']
#vb.customize ['usbfilter', 'add', '0',
# '--target', :id,
# '--name', 'teensy',
# '--vendorid', '0x16c0',
# '--productid','0x0478'
# ]
# Customize the amount of memory on the VM:
vb.memory = "512"
end

# This section allows you to customize the VMware VM
# settings, ie showing the GUI or upping the memory
# or cores if desired
config.vm.provider "vmware_workstation" do |vmw|
# Hide the VMware GUI when booting the machine
vmw.gui = false
# Customize the amount of memory on the VM:
vmw.memory = "512"
end

config.vm.provider "vmware_fusion" do |vmf|
# Hide the vmfare GUI when booting the machine
vmf.gui = false
# Customize the amount of memory on the VM:
vmf.memory = "512"
end
# This script ensures the required packages for AVR programming are installed
# It also ensures the system always gets the latest updates when powered on
# If this causes issues you can run a 'vagrant destroy' and then
# add a # before ,args: and run 'vagrant up' to get a working
# non-updated box and then attempt to troubleshoot or open a Github issue
config.vm.provision "shell", run: "always", path: "./util/avr_setup.sh", args: "-update"

config.vm.post_up_message = """
Log into the VM using 'vagrant ssh' on OSX or from Git Bash (Win)
or 'vagrant ssh-config' and Putty or Bitvise SSH or another SSH tool

Change directory (cd) to the keyboard you wish to program
(Optionally) modify your layout,
then run 'make clean'
and then 'make' to compile the .eep and .hex files.

Or you can copy and paste the example line below.
cd /vagrant; cd keyboard; cd ergodox_ez; make clean; make

"""
end

+ 60
- 0
doc/BUILD_GUIDE.md View File

@@ -0,0 +1,60 @@
# Build Guide

## Build Environment Setup

### Windows (Vista and later)
1. If you have ever installed WinAVR, uninstall it.
2. Install [MHV AVR Tools](https://infernoembedded.com/sites/default/files/project/MHV_AVR_Tools_20131101.exe). Disable smatch, but **be sure to leave the option to add the tools to the PATH checked**.
3. Install [MinGW](https://sourceforge.net/projects/mingw/files/Installer/mingw-get-setup.exe/download). During installation, uncheck the option to install a graphical user interface. **DO NOT change the default installation folder.** The scripts depend on the default location.
4. Clone this repository. [This link will download it as a zip file, which you'll need to extract.](https://github.com/jackhumbert/qmk_firmware/archive/master.zip) Open the extracted folder in Windows Explorer.
5. Double-click on the 1-setup-path-win batch script to run it. You'll need to accept a User Account Control prompt. Press the spacebar to dismiss the success message in the command prompt that pops up.
6. Right-click on the 2-setup-environment-win batch script, select "Run as administrator", and accept the User Account Control prompt. This part may take a couple of minutes, and you'll need to approve a driver installation, but once it finishes, your environment is complete!
7. Future build commands should be run from the standard Windows command prompt, which you can find by searching for "command prompt" from the start menu or start screen. Ignore the "MHV AVR Shell".

### Mac
If you're using [homebrew,](http://brew.sh/) you can use the following commands:

brew tap osx-cross/avr
brew install avr-libc
brew install dfu-programmer

This is the recommended method. If you don't have homebrew, [install it!](http://brew.sh/) It's very much worth it for anyone who works in the command line.

You can also try these instructions:

1. Install Xcode from the App Store.
2. Install the Command Line Tools from `Xcode->Preferences->Downloads`.
3. Install [DFU-Programmer][dfu-prog].

### Linux
Install AVR GCC, AVR libc, and dfu-progammer with your favorite package manager.

Debian/Ubuntu example:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install gcc-avr avr-libc dfu-programmer

### Vagrant
If you have any problems building the firmware, you can try using a tool called Vagrant. It will set up a virtual computer with a known configuration that's ready-to-go for firmware building. OLKB does NOT host the files for this virtual computer. Details on how to set up Vagrant are in the [VAGRANT_GUIDE file](VAGRANT_GUIDE.md).

## Verify Your Installation
1. If you haven't already, obtain this repository ([https://github.com/jackhumbert/qmk_firmware](https://github.com/jackhumbert/qmk_firmware)). You can either download it as a zip file and extract it, or clone it using the command line tool git or the Github Desktop application.
2. Open up a terminal or command prompt and navigate to the qmk_firmware folder using the `cd` command. The command prompt will typically open to your home directory. If, for example, you cloned the repository to your Documents folder, then you would type `cd Documents/qmk_firmware`. If you extracted the file from a zip, then it may be named `qmk_firmware-master` instead.
3. To confirm that you're in the correct location, you can display the contents of your current folder using the `dir` command on Windows, or the `ls` command on Linux or Mac. You should see several files, including `README.md` and a `quantum` folder. From here, you need to navigate to the appropriate folder under `keyboard/`. For example, if you're building for a Planck, run `cd keyboard/planck`.
4. Once you're in the correct keyboard-specific folder, run the `make` command. This should output a lot of information about the build process.

## Customizing, Building, and Deploying Your Firmware

Note: Some keyboard folders have non-standard organizations, and may not even support specifying alternate keymaps. Until these get reorganized, you will need to edit their default keymaps directly.

1. Running the `make` command from your keyboard's folder will generate a .hex file based on the default keymap. All keymaps for a particular keyboard live in the `keymaps` folder in that keyboard's folder. To create your own keymap, duplicate the folder `keymaps/default`, and rename it with your name, for example `jack`. Or, if you don't care about the ability to share your keymap with the community via GitHub, you can just modify the default keymap itself. Details on how to program keymap files can be found in other guides.
2. To build a keymap other than the default, type `KEYMAP=<name>` after `make`. So if I've named my keymap `jack`, the full command would be `make KEYMAP=jack`.
3. How you deploy the firmware will depend on whether you are using a PCB or a Teensy. In both cases, you'll need to put the keyboard in bootloader mode, either by pressing a button on the PCB/Teensy or pressing the key with the `RESET` keycode. Then, if you're using a PCB, just run `make KEYMAP=<name> dfu` to both build and deploy the firmware. If you're using a Teensy, you'll probably need to take the <keyboardname>.hex file that make produces in the keyboard's folder, and deploy it using the [Teensy Loader.](https://www.pjrc.com/teensy/loader.html)

## Helpful Tips
1. On Linux or OS X, you can run `sleep 5; make KEYMAP=<name> dfu` to delay building/deploying the firmware until for 5 seconds, giving you a chance to put the firmware into bootloader mode. You can change the 5 to any number of seconds.

## Troubleshooting
1. Try running `make clean` if the make command fails.

WIP

+ 339
- 0
doc/COPYING.GPLv2 View File

@@ -0,0 +1,339 @@
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apply and the section as a whole is intended to apply in other
circumstances.

It is not the purpose of this section to induce you to infringe any
patents or other property right claims or to contest validity of any
such claims; this section has the sole purpose of protecting the
integrity of the free software distribution system, which is
implemented by public license practices. Many people have made
generous contributions to the wide range of software distributed
through that system in reliance on consistent application of that
system; it is up to the author/donor to decide if he or she is willing
to distribute software through any other system and a licensee cannot
impose that choice.

This section is intended to make thoroughly clear what is believed to
be a consequence of the rest of this License.

8. If the distribution and/or use of the Program is restricted in
certain countries either by patents or by copyrighted interfaces, the
original copyright holder who places the Program under this License
may add an explicit geographical distribution limitation excluding
those countries, so that distribution is permitted only in or among
countries not thus excluded. In such case, this License incorporates
the limitation as if written in the body of this License.

9. The Free Software Foundation may publish revised and/or new versions
of the General Public License from time to time. Such new versions will
be similar in spirit to the present version, but may differ in detail to
address new problems or concerns.

Each version is given a distinguishing version number. If the Program
specifies a version number of this License which applies to it and "any
later version", you have the option of following the terms and conditions
either of that version or of any later version published by the Free
Software Foundation. If the Program does not specify a version number of
this License, you may choose any version ever published by the Free Software
Foundation.

10. If you wish to incorporate parts of the Program into other free
programs whose distribution conditions are different, write to the author
to ask for permission. For software which is copyrighted by the Free
Software Foundation, write to the Free Software Foundation; we sometimes
make exceptions for this. Our decision will be guided by the two goals
of preserving the free status of all derivatives of our free software and
of promoting the sharing and reuse of software generally.

NO WARRANTY

11. BECAUSE THE PROGRAM IS LICENSED FREE OF CHARGE, THERE IS NO WARRANTY
FOR THE PROGRAM, TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW. EXCEPT WHEN
OTHERWISE STATED IN WRITING THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND/OR OTHER PARTIES
PROVIDE THE PROGRAM "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED
OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE ENTIRE RISK AS
TO THE QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE OF THE PROGRAM IS WITH YOU. SHOULD THE
PROGRAM PROVE DEFECTIVE, YOU ASSUME THE COST OF ALL NECESSARY SERVICING,
REPAIR OR CORRECTION.

12. IN NO EVENT UNLESS REQUIRED BY APPLICABLE LAW OR AGREED TO IN WRITING
WILL ANY COPYRIGHT HOLDER, OR ANY OTHER PARTY WHO MAY MODIFY AND/OR
REDISTRIBUTE THE PROGRAM AS PERMITTED ABOVE, BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR DAMAGES,
INCLUDING ANY GENERAL, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING
OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE PROGRAM (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED
TO LOSS OF DATA OR DATA BEING RENDERED INACCURATE OR LOSSES SUSTAINED BY
YOU OR THIRD PARTIES OR A FAILURE OF THE PROGRAM TO OPERATE WITH ANY OTHER
PROGRAMS), EVEN IF SUCH HOLDER OR OTHER PARTY HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE
POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.

END OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS

How to Apply These Terms to Your New Programs

If you develop a new program, and you want it to be of the greatest
possible use to the public, the best way to achieve this is to make it
free software which everyone can redistribute and change under these terms.

To do so, attach the following notices to the program. It is safest
to attach them to the start of each source file to most effectively
convey the exclusion of warranty; and each file should have at least
the "copyright" line and a pointer to where the full notice is found.

<one line to give the program's name and a brief idea of what it does.>
Copyright (C) <year> <name of author>

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
(at your option) any later version.

This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
GNU General Public License for more details.

You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along
with this program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc.,
51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA 02110-1301 USA.

Also add information on how to contact you by electronic and paper mail.

If the program is interactive, make it output a short notice like this
when it starts in an interactive mode:

Gnomovision version 69, Copyright (C) year name of author
Gnomovision comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; for details type `show w'.
This is free software, and you are welcome to redistribute it
under certain conditions; type `show c' for details.

The hypothetical commands `show w' and `show c' should show the appropriate
parts of the General Public License. Of course, the commands you use may
be called something other than `show w' and `show c'; they could even be
mouse-clicks or menu items--whatever suits your program.

You should also get your employer (if you work as a programmer) or your
school, if any, to sign a "copyright disclaimer" for the program, if
necessary. Here is a sample; alter the names:

Yoyodyne, Inc., hereby disclaims all copyright interest in the program
`Gnomovision' (which makes passes at compilers) written by James Hacker.

<signature of Ty Coon>, 1 April 1989
Ty Coon, President of Vice

This General Public License does not permit incorporating your program into
proprietary programs. If your program is a subroutine library, you may
consider it more useful to permit linking proprietary applications with the
library. If this is what you want to do, use the GNU Lesser General
Public License instead of this License.

+ 674
- 0
doc/COPYING.GPLv3 View File

@@ -0,0 +1,674 @@
GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE
Version 3, 29 June 2007

Copyright (C) 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc. <http://fsf.org/>
Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies
of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.

Preamble

The GNU General Public License is a free, copyleft license for
software and other kinds of works.

The licenses for most software and other practical works are designed
to take away your freedom to share and change the works. By contrast,
the GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to
share and change all versions of a program--to make sure it remains free
software for all its users. We, the Free Software Foundation, use the
GNU General Public License for most of our software; it applies also to
any other work released this way by its authors. You can apply it to
your programs, too.

When we speak of free software, we are referring to freedom, not
price. Our General Public Licenses are designed to make sure that you
have the freedom to distribute copies of free software (and charge for
them if you wish), that you receive source code or can get it if you
want it, that you can change the software or use pieces of it in new
free programs, and that you know you can do these things.

To protect your rights, we need to prevent others from denying you
these rights or asking you to surrender the rights. Therefore, you have
certain responsibilities if you distribute copies of the software, or if
you modify it: responsibilities to respect the freedom of others.

For example, if you distribute copies of such a program, whether
gratis or for a fee, you must pass on to the recipients the same
freedoms that you received. You must make sure that they, too, receive
or can get the source code. And you must show them these terms so they
know their rights.

Developers that use the GNU GPL protect your rights with two steps:
(1) assert copyright on the software, and (2) offer you this License
giving you legal permission to copy, distribute and/or modify it.

For the developers' and authors' protection, the GPL clearly explains
that there is no warranty for this free software. For both users' and
authors' sake, the GPL requires that modified versions be marked as
changed, so that their problems will not be attributed erroneously to
authors of previous versions.

Some devices are designed to deny users access to install or run
modified versions of the software inside them, although the manufacturer
can do so. This is fundamentally incompatible with the aim of
protecting users' freedom to change the software. The systematic
pattern of such abuse occurs in the area of products for individuals to
use, which is precisely where it is most unacceptable. Therefore, we
have designed this version of the GPL to prohibit the practice for those
products. If such problems arise substantially in other domains, we
stand ready to extend this provision to those domains in future versions
of the GPL, as needed to protect the freedom of users.

Finally, every program is threatened constantly by software patents.
States should not allow patents to restrict development and use of
software on general-purpose computers, but in those that do, we wish to
avoid the special danger that patents applied to a free program could
make it effectively proprietary. To prevent this, the GPL assures that
patents cannot be used to render the program non-free.

The precise terms and conditions for copying, distribution and
modification follow.

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

0. Definitions.

"This License" refers to version 3 of the GNU General Public License.

"Copyright" also means copyright-like laws that apply to other kinds of
works, such as semiconductor masks.

"The Program" refers to any copyrightable work licensed under this
License. Each licensee is addressed as "you". "Licensees" and
"recipients" may be individuals or organizations.

To "modify" a work means to copy from or adapt all or part of the work
in a fashion requiring copyright permission, other than the making of an
exact copy. The resulting work is called a "modified version" of the
earlier work or a work "based on" the earlier work.

A "covered work" means either the unmodified Program or a work based
on the Program.

To "propagate" a work means to do anything with it that, without
permission, would make you directly or secondarily liable for
infringement under applicable copyright law, except executing it on a
computer or modifying a private copy. Propagation includes copying,
distribution (with or without modification), making available to the
public, and in some countries other activities as well.

To "convey" a work means any kind of propagation that enables other
parties to make or receive copies. Mere interaction with a user through
a computer network, with no transfer of a copy, is not conveying.

An interactive user interface displays "Appropriate Legal Notices"
to the extent that it includes a convenient and prominently visible
feature that (1) displays an appropriate copyright notice, and (2)
tells the user that there is no warranty for the work (except to the
extent that warranties are provided), that licensees may convey the
work under this License, and how to view a copy of this License. If
the interface presents a list of user commands or options, such as a
menu, a prominent item in the list meets this criterion.

1. Source Code.

The "source code" for a work means the preferred form of the work
for making modifications to it. "Object code" means any non-source
form of a work.

A "Standard Interface" means an interface that either is an official
standard defined by a recognized standards body, or, in the case of
interfaces specified for a particular programming language, one that
is widely used among developers working in that language.

The "System Libraries" of an executable work include anything, other
than the work as a whole, that (a) is included in the normal form of
packaging a Major Component, but which is not part of that Major
Component, and (b) serves only to enable use of the work with that
Major Component, or to implement a Standard Interface for which an
implementation is available to the public in source code form. A
"Major Component", in this context, means a major essential component
(kernel, window system, and so on) of the specific operating system
(if any) on which the executable work runs, or a compiler used to
produce the work, or an object code interpreter used to run it.

The "Corresponding Source" for a work in object code form means all
the source code needed to generate, install, and (for an executable
work) run the object code and to modify the work, including scripts to
control those activities. However, it does not include the work's
System Libraries, or general-purpose tools or generally available free
programs which are used unmodified in performing those activities but
which are not part of the work. For example, Corresponding Source
includes interface definition files associated with source files for
the work, and the source code for shared libraries and dynamically
linked subprograms that the work is specifically designed to require,
such as by intimate data communication or control flow between those
subprograms and other parts of the work.

The Corresponding Source need not include anything that users
can regenerate automatically from other parts of the Corresponding
Source.

The Corresponding Source for a work in source code form is that
same work.

2. Basic Permissions.

All rights granted under this License are granted for the term of
copyright on the Program, and are irrevocable provided the stated
conditions are met. This License explicitly affirms your unlimited
permission to run the unmodified Program. The output from running a
covered work is covered by this License only if the output, given its
content, constitutes a covered work. This License acknowledges your
rights of fair use or other equivalent, as provided by copyright law.

You may make, run and propagate covered works that you do not
convey, without conditions so long as your license otherwise remains
in force. You may convey covered works to others for the sole purpose
of having them make modifications exclusively for you, or provide you
with facilities for running those works, provided that you comply with
the terms of this License in conveying all material for which you do
not control copyright. Those thus making or running the covered works
for you must do so exclusively on your behalf, under your direction
and control, on terms that prohibit them from making any copies of
your copyrighted material outside their relationship with you.

Conveying under any other circumstances is permitted solely under
the conditions stated below. Sublicensing is not allowed; section 10
makes it unnecessary.

3. Protecting Users' Legal Rights From Anti-Circumvention Law.

No covered work shall be deemed part of an effective technological
measure under any applicable law fulfilling obligations under article
11 of the WIPO copyright treaty adopted on 20 December 1996, or
similar laws prohibiting or restricting circumvention of such
measures.

When you convey a covered work, you waive any legal power to forbid
circumvention of technological measures to the extent such circumvention
is effected by exercising rights under this License with respect to
the covered work, and you disclaim any intention to limit operation or
modification of the work as a means of enforcing, against the work's
users, your or third parties' legal rights to forbid circumvention of
technological measures.

4. Conveying Verbatim Copies.

You may convey verbatim copies of the Program's source code as you
receive it, in any medium, provided that you conspicuously and
appropriately publish on each copy an appropriate copyright notice;
keep intact all notices stating that this License and any
non-permissive terms added in accord with section 7 apply to the code;
keep intact all notices of the absence of any warranty; and give all
recipients a copy of this License along with the Program.

You may charge any price or no price for each copy that you convey,
and you may offer support or warranty protection for a fee.

5. Conveying Modified Source Versions.

You may convey a work based on the Program, or the modifications to
produce it from the Program, in the form of source code under the
terms of section 4, provided that you also meet all of these conditions:

a) The work must carry prominent notices stating that you modified
it, and giving a relevant date.

b) The work must carry prominent notices stating that it is
released under this License and any conditions added under section
7. This requirement modifies the requirement in section 4 to
"keep intact all notices".

c) You must license the entire work, as a whole, under this
License to anyone who comes into possession of a copy. This
License will therefore apply, along with any applicable section 7
additional terms, to the whole of the work, and all its parts,
regardless of how they are packaged. This License gives no
permission to license the work in any other way, but it does not
invalidate such permission if you have separately received it.

d) If the work has interactive user interfaces, each must display
Appropriate Legal Notices; however, if the Program has interactive
interfaces that do not display Appropriate Legal Notices, your
work need not make them do so.

A compilation of a covered work with other separate and independent
works, which are not by their nature extensions of the covered work,
and which are not combined with it such as to form a larger program,
in or on a volume of a storage or distribution medium, is called an
"aggregate" if the compilation and its resulting copyright are not
used to limit the access or legal rights of the compilation's users
beyond what the individual works permit. Inclusion of a covered work
in an aggregate does not cause this License to apply to the other
parts of the aggregate.

6. Conveying Non-Source Forms.

You may convey a covered work in object code form under the terms
of sections 4 and 5, provided that you also convey the
machine-readable Corresponding Source under the terms of this License,
in one of these ways:

a) Convey the object code in, or embodied in, a physical product
(including a physical distribution medium), accompanied by the
Corresponding Source fixed on a durable physical medium
customarily used for software interchange.

b) Convey the object code in, or embodied in, a physical product
(including a physical distribution medium), accompanied by a
written offer, valid for at least three years and valid for as
long as you offer spare parts or customer support for that product
model, to give anyone who possesses the object code either (1) a
copy of the Corresponding Source for all the software in the
product that is covered by this License, on a durable physical
medium customarily used for software interchange, for a price no
more than your reasonable cost of physically performing this
conveying of source, or (2) access to copy the
Corresponding Source from a network server at no charge.

c) Convey individual copies of the object code with a copy of the
written offer to provide the Corresponding Source. This
alternative is allowed only occasionally and noncommercially, and
only if you received the object code with such an offer, in accord
with subsection 6b.

d) Convey the object code by offering access from a designated
place (gratis or for a charge), and offer equivalent access to the
Corresponding Source in the same way through the same place at no
further charge. You need not require recipients to copy the
Corresponding Source along with the object code. If the place to
copy the object code is a network server, the Corresponding Source
may be on a different server (operated by you or a third party)
that supports equivalent copying facilities, provided you maintain
clear directions next to the object code saying where to find the
Corresponding Source. Regardless of what server hosts the
Corresponding Source, you remain obligated to ensure that it is
available for as long as needed to satisfy these requirements.

e) Convey the object code using peer-to-peer transmission, provided
you inform other peers where the object code and Corresponding
Source of the work are being offered to the general public at no
charge under subsection 6d.

A separable portion of the object code, whose source code is excluded
from the Corresponding Source as a System Library, need not be
included in conveying the object code work.

A "User Product" is either (1) a "consumer product", which means any
tangible personal property which is normally used for personal, family,
or household purposes, or (2) anything designed or sold for incorporation
into a dwelling. In determining whether a product is a consumer product,
doubtful cases shall be resolved in favor of coverage. For a particular
product received by a particular user, "normally used" refers to a
typical or common use of that class of product, regardless of the status
of the particular user or of the way in which the particular user
actually uses, or expects or is expected to use, the product. A product
is a consumer product regardless of whether the product has substantial
commercial, industrial or non-consumer uses, unless such uses represent
the only significant mode of use of the product.

"Installation Information" for a User Product means any methods,
procedures, authorization keys, or other information required to install
and execute modified versions of a covered work in that User Product from
a modified version of its Corresponding Source. The information must
suffice to ensure that the continued functioning of the modified object
code is in no case prevented or interfered with solely because
modification has been made.

If you convey an object code work under this section in, or with, or
specifically for use in, a User Product, and the conveying occurs as
part of a transaction in which the right of possession and use of the
User Product is transferred to the recipient in perpetuity or for a
fixed term (regardless of how the transaction is characterized), the
Corresponding Source conveyed under this section must be accompanied
by the Installation Information. But this requirement does not apply
if neither you nor any third party retains the ability to install
modified object code on the User Product (for example, the work has
been installed in ROM).

The requirement to provide Installation Information does not include a
requirement to continue to provide support service, warranty, or updates
for a work that has been modified or installed by the recipient, or for
the User Product in which it has been modified or installed. Access to a
network may be denied when the modification itself materially and
adversely affects the operation of the network or violates the rules and
protocols for communication across the network.

Corresponding Source conveyed, and Installation Information provided,
in accord with this section must be in a format that is publicly
documented (and with an implementation available to the public in
source code form), and must require no special password or key for
unpacking, reading or copying.

7. Additional Terms.

"Additional permissions" are terms that supplement the terms of this
License by making exceptions from one or more of its conditions.
Additional permissions that are applicable to the entire Program shall
be treated as though they were included in this License, to the extent
that they are valid under applicable law. If additional permissions
apply only to part of the Program, that part may be used separately
under those permissions, but the entire Program remains governed by
this License without regard to the additional permissions.

When you convey a copy of a covered work, you may at your option
remove any additional permissions from that copy, or from any part of
it. (Additional permissions may be written to require their own
removal in certain cases when you modify the work.) You may place
additional permissions on material, added by you to a covered work,
for which you have or can give appropriate copyright permission.

Notwithstanding any other provision of this License, for material you
add to a covered work, you may (if authorized by the copyright holders of
that material) supplement the terms of this License with terms:

a) Disclaiming warranty or limiting liability differently from the
terms of sections 15 and 16 of this License; or

b) Requiring preservation of specified reasonable legal notices or
author attributions in that material or in the Appropriate Legal
Notices displayed by works containing it; or

c) Prohibiting misrepresentation of the origin of that material, or
requiring that modified versions of such material be marked in
reasonable ways as different from the original version; or

d) Limiting the use for publicity purposes of names of licensors or
authors of the material; or

e) Declining to grant rights under trademark law for use of some
trade names, trademarks, or service marks; or

f) Requiring indemnification of licensors and authors of that
material by anyone who conveys the material (or modified versions of
it) with contractual assumptions of liability to the recipient, for
any liability that these contractual assumptions directly impose on
those licensors and authors.

All other non-permissive additional terms are considered "further
restrictions" within the meaning of section 10. If the Program as you
received it, or any part of it, contains a notice stating that it is
governed by this License along with a term that is a further
restriction, you may remove that term. If a license document contains
a further restriction but permits relicensing or conveying under this
License, you may add to a covered work material governed by the terms
of that license document, provided that the further restriction does
not survive such relicensing or conveying.

If you add terms to a covered work in accord with this section, you
must place, in the relevant source files, a statement of the
additional terms that apply to those files, or a notice indicating
where to find the applicable terms.

Additional terms, permissive or non-permissive, may be stated in the
form of a separately written license, or stated as exceptions;
the above requirements apply either way.

8. Termination.

You may not propagate or modify a covered work except as expressly
provided under this License. Any attempt otherwise to propagate or
modify it is void, and will automatically terminate your rights under
this License (including any patent licenses granted under the third
paragraph of section 11).

However, if you cease all violation of this License, then your
license from a particular copyright holder is reinstated (a)
provisionally, unless and until the copyright holder explicitly and
finally terminates your license, and (b) permanently, if the copyright
holder fails to notify you of the violation by some reasonable means
prior to 60 days after the cessation.

Moreover, your license from a particular copyright holder is
reinstated permanently if the copyright holder notifies you of the
violation by some reasonable means, this is the first time you have
received notice of violation of this License (for any work) from that
copyright holder, and you cure the violation prior to 30 days after
your receipt of the notice.

Termination of your rights under this section does not terminate the
licenses of parties who have received copies or rights from you under
this License. If your rights have been terminated and not permanently
reinstated, you do not qualify to receive new licenses for the same
material under section 10.

9. Acceptance Not Required for Having Copies.

You are not required to accept this License in order to receive or
run a copy of the Program. Ancillary propagation of a covered work
occurring solely as a consequence of using peer-to-peer transmission
to receive a copy likewise does not require acceptance. However,
nothing other than this License grants you permission to propagate or
modify any covered work. These actions infringe copyright if you do
not accept this License. Therefore, by modifying or propagating a
covered work, you indicate your acceptance of this License to do so.

10. Automatic Licensing of Downstream Recipients.

Each time you convey a covered work, the recipient automatically
receives a license from the original licensors, to run, modify and
propagate that work, subject to this License. You are not responsible
for enforcing compliance by third parties with this License.

An "entity transaction" is a transaction transferring control of an
organization, or substantially all assets of one, or subdividing an
organization, or merging organizations. If propagation of a covered
work results from an entity transaction, each party to that
transaction who receives a copy of the work also receives whatever
licenses to the work the party's predecessor in interest had or could
give under the previous paragraph, plus a right to possession of the
Corresponding Source of the work from the predecessor in interest, if
the predecessor has it or can get it with reasonable efforts.

You may not impose any further restrictions on the exercise of the
rights granted or affirmed under this License. For example, you may
not impose a license fee, royalty, or other charge for exercise of
rights granted under this License, and you may not initiate litigation
(including a cross-claim or counterclaim in a lawsuit) alleging that
any patent claim is infringed by making, using, selling, offering for
sale, or importing the Program or any portion of it.

11. Patents.

A "contributor" is a copyright holder who authorizes use under this
License of the Program or a work on which the Program is based. The
work thus licensed is called the contributor's "contributor version".

A contributor's "essential patent claims" are all patent claims
owned or controlled by the contributor, whether already acquired or
hereafter acquired, that would be infringed by some manner, permitted
by this License, of making, using, or selling its contributor version,
but do not include claims that would be infringed only as a
consequence of further modification of the contributor version. For
purposes of this definition, "control" includes the right to grant
patent sublicenses in a manner consistent with the requirements of
this License.

Each contributor grants you a non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free
patent license under the contributor's essential patent claims, to
make, use, sell, offer for sale, import and otherwise run, modify and
propagate the contents of its contributor version.

In the following three paragraphs, a "patent license" is any express
agreement or commitment, however denominated, not to enforce a patent
(such as an express permission to practice a patent or covenant not to
sue for patent infringement). To "grant" such a patent license to a
party means to make such an agreement or commitment not to enforce a
patent against the party.

If you convey a covered work, knowingly relying on a patent license,
and the Corresponding Source of the work is not available for anyone
to copy, free of charge and under the terms of this License, through a
publicly available network server or other readily accessible means,
then you must either (1) cause the Corresponding Source to be so
available, or (2) arrange to deprive yourself of the benefit of the
patent license for this particular work, or (3) arrange, in a manner
consistent with the requirements of this License, to extend the patent
license to downstream recipients. "Knowingly relying" means you have
actual knowledge that, but for the patent license, your conveying the
covered work in a country, or your recipient's use of the covered work
in a country, would infringe one or more identifiable patents in that
country that you have reason to believe are valid.

If, pursuant to or in connection with a single transaction or
arrangement, you convey, or propagate by procuring conveyance of, a
covered work, and grant a patent license to some of the parties
receiving the covered work authorizing them to use, propagate, modify
or convey a specific copy of the covered work, then the patent license
you grant is automatically extended to all recipients of the covered
work and works based on it.

A patent license is "discriminatory" if it does not include within
the scope of its coverage, prohibits the exercise of, or is
conditioned on the non-exercise of one or more of the rights that are
specifically granted under this License. You may not convey a covered
work if you are a party to an arrangement with a third party that is
in the business of distributing software, under which you make payment
to the third party based on the extent of your activity of conveying
the work, and under which the third party grants, to any of the
parties who would receive the covered work from you, a discriminatory
patent license (a) in connection with copies of the covered work
conveyed by you (or copies made from those copies), or (b) primarily
for and in connection with specific products or compilations that
contain the covered work, unless you entered into that arrangement,
or that patent license was granted, prior to 28 March 2007.

Nothing in this License shall be construed as excluding or limiting
any implied license or other defenses to infringement that may
otherwise be available to you under applicable patent law.

12. No Surrender of Others' Freedom.

If conditions are imposed on you (whether by court order, agreement or
otherwise) that contradict the conditions of this License, they do not
excuse you from the conditions of this License. If you cannot convey a
covered work so as to satisfy simultaneously your obligations under this
License and any other pertinent obligations, then as a consequence you may
not convey it at all. For example, if you agree to terms that obligate you
to collect a royalty for further conveying from those to whom you convey
the Program, the only way you could satisfy both those terms and this
License would be to refrain entirely from conveying the Program.

13. Use with the GNU Affero General Public License.

Notwithstanding any other provision of this License, you have
permission to link or combine any covered work with a work licensed
under version 3 of the GNU Affero General Public License into a single
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but the special requirements of the GNU Affero General Public License,
section 13, concerning interaction through a network will apply to the
combination as such.

14. Revised Versions of this License.

The Free Software Foundation may publish revised and/or new versions of
the GNU General Public License from time to time. Such new versions will
be similar in spirit to the present version, but may differ in detail to
address new problems or concerns.

Each version is given a distinguishing version number. If the
Program specifies that a certain numbered version of the GNU General
Public License "or any later version" applies to it, you have the
option of following the terms and conditions either of that numbered
version or of any later version published by the Free Software
Foundation. If the Program does not specify a version number of the
GNU General Public License, you may choose any version ever published
by the Free Software Foundation.

If the Program specifies that a proxy can decide which future
versions of the GNU General Public License can be used, that proxy's
public statement of acceptance of a version permanently authorizes you
to choose that version for the Program.

Later license versions may give you additional or different
permissions. However, no additional obligations are imposed on any
author or copyright holder as a result of your choosing to follow a
later version.

15. Disclaimer of Warranty.

THERE IS NO WARRANTY FOR THE PROGRAM, TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY
APPLICABLE LAW. EXCEPT WHEN OTHERWISE STATED IN WRITING THE COPYRIGHT
HOLDERS AND/OR OTHER PARTIES PROVIDE THE PROGRAM "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY
OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE. THE ENTIRE RISK AS TO THE QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE OF THE PROGRAM
IS WITH YOU. SHOULD THE PROGRAM PROVE DEFECTIVE, YOU ASSUME THE COST OF
ALL NECESSARY SERVICING, REPAIR OR CORRECTION.

16. Limitation of Liability.

IN NO EVENT UNLESS REQUIRED BY APPLICABLE LAW OR AGREED TO IN WRITING
WILL ANY COPYRIGHT HOLDER, OR ANY OTHER PARTY WHO MODIFIES AND/OR CONVEYS
THE PROGRAM AS PERMITTED ABOVE, BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR DAMAGES, INCLUDING ANY
GENERAL, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THE
USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE PROGRAM (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO LOSS OF
DATA OR DATA BEING RENDERED INACCURATE OR LOSSES SUSTAINED BY YOU OR THIRD
PARTIES OR A FAILURE OF THE PROGRAM TO OPERATE WITH ANY OTHER PROGRAMS),
EVEN IF SUCH HOLDER OR OTHER PARTY HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
SUCH DAMAGES.

17. Interpretation of Sections 15 and 16.

If the disclaimer of warranty and limitation of liability provided
above cannot be given local legal effect according to their terms,
reviewing courts shall apply local law that most closely approximates
an absolute waiver of all civil liability in connection with the
Program, unless a warranty or assumption of liability accompanies a
copy of the Program in return for a fee.

END OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS

How to Apply These Terms to Your New Programs

If you develop a new program, and you want it to be of the greatest
possible use to the public, the best way to achieve this is to make it
free software which everyone can redistribute and change under these terms.

To do so, attach the following notices to the program. It is safest
to attach them to the start of each source file to most effectively
state the exclusion of warranty; and each file should have at least
the "copyright" line and a pointer to where the full notice is found.

<one line to give the program's name and a brief idea of what it does.>
Copyright (C) <year> <name of author>

This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
(at your option) any later version.

This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
GNU General Public License for more details.

You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
along with this program. If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.

Also add information on how to contact you by electronic and paper mail.

If the program does terminal interaction, make it output a short
notice like this when it starts in an interactive mode:

<program> Copyright (C) <year> <name of author>
This program comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; for details type `show w'.
This is free software, and you are welcome to redistribute it
under certain conditions; type `show c' for details.

The hypothetical commands `show w' and `show c' should show the appropriate
parts of the General Public License. Of course, your program's commands
might be different; for a GUI interface, you would use an "about box".

You should also get your employer (if you work as a programmer) or school,
if any, to sign a "copyright disclaimer" for the program, if necessary.
For more information on this, and how to apply and follow the GNU GPL, see
<http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.

The GNU General Public License does not permit incorporating your program
into proprietary programs. If your program is a subroutine library, you
may consider it more useful to permit linking proprietary applications with
the library. If this is what you want to do, use the GNU Lesser General
Public License instead of this License. But first, please read
<http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/why-not-lgpl.html>.

+ 352
- 0
doc/CYGWIN_GUIDE.md View File

@@ -0,0 +1,352 @@
#Planck Advanced (but not too advanced) `cygwin` Users Guide
If you are a user of the [cygwin environment](https://cygwin.com) in Windows and want the freedom to use the latest tools available, then this is the guide for you. If compiling your own copy of the latest and greatest Gnu C Compiler makes you super happy, then this is the guide for you. If the command line make you smile, then this is the guide for you.

This guide was written step by step as I went through the process on a `Windows 10` `x86_64` and a `Windows 7` `amd k10` based system. This should be generally applicable to to any `Windows` environment with `cygwin`.

#####Do not skip steps. Do not move past a step until the previous step finishes successfully.

Based on [avr-libc installation guide](http://www.nongnu.org/avr-libc/user-manual/install_tools.html)

##Get the Required Packages
Download the `cygwin` setup ([x86_64](https://cygwin.com/setup-x86_64.exe)) and install the default system plus the following if they are not already selected:
- devel/git
- devel/gcc-core
- devel/gcc-g++
- devel/flex
- devel/bison
- devel/make
- devel/texinfo
- devel/gettext-devel
- devel/automake
- devel/autoconfig
- devel/libtool
- text/gettext
- libs/libgcc1
- interpreters/m4
- web/wget
- archive/unzip

The following sources will be required:
- [gmp](https://gmplib.org/) (6.1.0)
- [mpfr](http://www.mpfr.org/) (3.1.4)
- [mpc](http://www.multiprecision.org/) (1.0.3)
- [binutils](https://www.sourceware.org/binutils/) (2.26)
- [gcc](https://gcc.gnu.org/) (5.3.0)
- [avr-libc](http://www.nongnu.org/avr-libc/) (2.0.0)

The `dfu-programmer` will be required to flash the new firmware
- [dfu-programmer](https://dfu-programmer.github.io/) (0.7.2)

The set of commands below will create a directory (`~/local/avr`) for the sources you compile to be installed on the machine and a directory (`~/src`) for these source files to be stored. The commands then download the sources of the needed packages and unpack them. Note: the expand commands are different depending on if the packages are offered as a `bz2` or `gz` archive
```
$ mkdir ~/local
$ mkdir ~/local/avr
$ mkdir ~/src
$ cd ~/src
$ wget https://gmplib.org/download/gmp/gmp-6.1.0.tar.bz2
$ wget http://www.mpfr.org/mpfr-3.1.4/mpfr-3.1.4.tar.bz2
$ wget ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/mpc/mpc-1.0.3.tar.gz
$ wget http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/binutils/binutils-2.26.tar.gz
$ wget http://mirror0.babylon.network/gcc/releases/gcc-5.3.0/gcc-5.3.0.tar.gz
$ wget http://download.savannah.gnu.org/releases/avr-libc/avr-libc-2.0.0.tar.bz2
$ tar -xjf gmp-6.1.0.tar.bz2
$ tar -xjf mpfr-3.1.4.tar.bz2
$ tar -zxf mpc-1.0.3.tar.gz
$ tar -zxf binutils-2.26.tar.gz
$ tar -zxf gcc-5.3.0.tar.gz
$ tar -xjf avr-libc-2.0.0.tar.bz2
```

##Setup the Build Environment
These commands will set up the install directory and the `PATH` variable, which will allow you to access your installed packages. Note: if you close the `cygwin` terminal window, you will need to rerun these commands, they are not permanent.
```
$ PREFIX=$HOME/local/avr
$ export PREFIX
$ PATH=/usr/local/bin:/usr/local/lib:/usr/local/include:/bin:/lib:/cygdrive/c/WINDOWS/system32:/cygdrive/c/WINDOWS
$ PATH=$PATH:$PREFIX/bin:$PREFIX/lib
$ export PATH
```

##The `gcc` Required Math Library Packages
The following packages are required to be complied and installed in order to compile `gcc`. They are not sufficiently available through the `cygwin` package system, so we have to make them ourselves. They must be complied in this order because each one depends on the previous. Verfiy that for each package, `make check` returns all passing and no fails.

###Build and Install `gmp`
```
$ cd ~/src/gmp-6.1.0
$ ./configure --enable-static --disable-shared
$ make
$ make check
$ make install
```

###Build and Install `mpfr`
```
$ cd ~/src/mpfr-3.1.4
$ ./configure --with-gmp-build=../gmp-6.1.0 --enable-static --disable-shared
$ make
$ make check
$ make install
```

###Build and Install `mpc`
```
$ cd ~/src/mpc-1.0.3
$ ./configure --with-gmp=/usr/local --with-mpfr=/usr/local --enable-static --disable-shared
$ make
$ make check
$ make install
```

##OPTIONAL Part
You can build and install a brand new `gcc` or you can use the one supplied by `cygwin`. This will take about 4-5 hours to compile (It is a "native build", so it does the entire build **3 times**. This takes a long while).

###Build and Install `gcc` for Your Machine
```
$ cd ~/src/gcc-5.3.0
$ mkdir obj-local
$ cd obj-local
$ ../configure --enable-languages=c,c++ --with-gmp=/usr/local --with-mpfr=/usr/local --with-mpc=/usr/local --enable-static --disable-shared
$ make
$ make install
```
##End OPTIONAL Part

###Build and Install `binutils` for Your Machine
```
$ cd ~/src/binutils-2.26
$ mkdir obj-local
$ cd obj-local
$ ../configure
$ make
$ make install
```

##Buliding `binutils`, `gcc`, and `avr-libc` for the AVR system
Now we can make the critical stuff for compiling our firmware: `binutils`, `gcc`, and `avr-libc` for the AVR architecture. These allow us to build and manipulate the firmware for the keyboard.

###Build `binutils` for AVR
If you plan to build and install `avr-gdb` also, use the `gdb` install at the end of this guide as it also builds the `binutils`
```
$ cd ~/src/binutils-2.26
$ mkdir obj-avr
$ cd obj-avr
$ ../configure --prefix=$PREFIX --target=avr --disable-nls
$ make
$ make install
```

###Build `gcc` for AVR
```
$ cd ~/src/gcc-5.3.0
$ mkdir obj-avr
$ cd obj-avr
$ ../configure --prefix=$PREFIX --target=avr --enable-languages=c,c++ --with-gmp=/usr/local --with-mpfr=/usr/local --with-mpc=/usr/local --enable-static --disable-shared --disable-nls --disable-libssp --with-dwarf2
$ make
$ make install
```

###Build `avr-libc` for AVR
For building the `avr-libc`, we have to specify the host build system. In my case it is `x86_64-unknown-cygwin`. You can look for build system type in the `gcc` configure notes for the proper `--build` specification to pass when you configure `avr-libc`.
```
$ cd ~/src/avr-libc-2.0.0
$ ./configure --prefix=$PREFIX --build=x86_64-unknown-cygwin --host=avr
$ make
$ make install
```

##Building 'dfu-programmer' for flashing the firmware via USB and installing the drivers
We can either build our own, or use the precomplied binaries. The precompiled binaries don't play well with `cygwin` so it is better to build them ourselves. The procedure for the precompiled binaries is included at the end of this guide.

### Build and Install the `libusb`
The `dfu-programmer` requires `libusb` so that it can interact with the USB system. These repos must be bootstrapped in order to create an appropriate `./configure` and `Makefile` for your system.
```
$ cd ~/src
$ git clone https://github.com/libusb/libusb.git
$ cd libusb
$ ./bootstrap.sh
$ ./configure
$ make
$ make install
```

### Build and Install the `dfu-programmer`
```
$ cd ~/src
$ git clone https://github.com/dfu-programmer/dfu-programmer.git
$ cd dfu-programmer
$ ./bootstrap.sh
$ ./configure
$ make
$ make install
```

Verify the installation with:
```
$ which dfu-programmer
/usr/local/bin/dfu-programmer

$ dfu-programmer
dfu-programmer 0.7.2
https://github.com/dfu-programmer/dfu-programmer
Type 'dfu-programmer --help' for a list of commands
'dfu-programmer --targets' to list supported target devices
```
If you are not getting the above result, you will not be able to flash the firmware!

###Install the USB drivers
The drivers are included in the windows binary version of [`dfu-programmer` 0.7.2](http://iweb.dl.sourceforge.net/project/dfu-programmer/dfu-programmer/0.7.2/dfu-programmer-win-0.7.2.zip).
```
$ cd ~/src
$ wget http://iweb.dl.sourceforge.net/project/dfu-programmer/dfu-programmer/0.7.2/dfu-programmer-win-0.7.2.zip
$ unzip dfu-programmer-win-0.7.2.zip -d dfu-programmer-win-0.7.2
```

or

The official drivers are found in [Atmel's `FLIP` installer](http://www.atmel.com/images/Flip%20Installer%20-%203.4.7.112.exe). Download and then install `FLIP`. Upon installation, the drivers will be found in `C:\Program Files (x86)\Atmel\Flip 3.4.7\usb`.

Then, from an **administrator-privileged** `Windows` terminal, run the following command (adjust the path for username, etc. as necessary) and accept the prompt that pops up:
```
C:\> pnputil -i -a C:\cygwin64\home\Kevin\src\dfu-programmer-win-0.7.2\dfu-prog-usb-1.2.2\atmel_usb_dfu.inf
or
C:\> pnputil -i -a "C:\Program Files (x86)\Atmel\Flip 3.4.7\usb\atmel_usb_dfu.inf"
```

This should be the result:
```
Microsoft PnP Utility

Processing inf : atmel_usb_dfu.inf
Successfully installed the driver on a device on the system.
Driver package added successfully.
Published name : oem104.inf


Total attempted: 1
Number successfully imported: 1
```

Alternatively, the `Windows` driver can be installed when prompted by `Windows` when the keyboard is attached. Do not let `Windows` search for a driver; specify the path to search for a driver and point it to the `atmel_usb_dfu.inf` file.

##Building and Flashing the Planck firmware!
If you did everything else right. This part should be a snap! Grab the latest sources from `github`, make the Plank firmware, then flash it.

###Build Planck and Load the Firmware
```
$ cd ~/src
$ git clone https://github.com/jackhumbert/qmk_firmware.git
$ cd qmk_firmware/keyboard/planck
$ make
```

Make sure there are no errors. You should end up with this or something similar:
```
Creating load file for Flash: planck.hex
avr-objcopy -O ihex -R .eeprom -R .fuse -R .lock -R .signature planck.elf planck.hex

Creating load file for EEPROM: planck.eep
avr-objcopy -j .eeprom --set-section-flags=.eeprom="alloc,load" \
--change-section-lma .eeprom=0 --no-change-warnings -O ihex planck.elf planck.eep || exit 0

Creating Extended Listing: planck.lss
avr-objdump -h -S -z planck.elf > planck.lss

Creating Symbol Table: planck.sym
avr-nm -n planck.elf > planck.sym

Size after:
text data bss dec hex filename
18602 82 155 18839 4997 planck.elf

-------- end --------
```

If you do not get the above, you **did not** build the firmware, and you will have nothing to flash. If you have the fresh clone from `github`, it was probably something gone wrong in this install process, go check and see what didn't work and threw errors or what steps you might have missed.

But if everything went OK, you are ready to flash! Press the reset button on the bottom of the Planck, wait two seconds, then:
```
$ make dfu
```
.
.
.
profit!!!





##extra bits...

###Installing Precompiled `dfu-programmer` Binaries (not recommended for `cygwin`)
To install the `dfu-programmer` from the binaries, we must get if from [the `dfu-programmer` website](https://dfu-programmer.github.io/) ([0.7.2](http://iweb.dl.sourceforge.net/project/dfu-programmer/dfu-programmer/0.7.2/dfu-programmer-win-0.7.2.zip)).

Copy this file into your `cygwin` home\src directory. (For me, it is `C:\cygwin64\home\Kevin\src`), extract the files, move `dfu-programmer.exe` to `~/local/avr/bin`. Most obnoxiously, the `libusb0_x86.dll` and `libusb0.sys` need to be moved from `./dfu-prog-usb-1.2.2/x86/` to a directory in the `Windows` `PATH` and the `cygwin` `PATH`. This is because the `dfu-programmer` binary is `mingw` based, not `cygwin` based, so the `dlls` do not cooperate. I achieved acceptable pathing by moving the files to `C:\cygwin64\home\Kevin\local\avr\bin` Then, in a `WINDOWS` command prompt running (Adjusting your path for username, etc. as needed):
```
C:\> set PATH=%PATH%;C:\cygwin64\home\Kevin\local\avr\bin
```

Then, rename `libusb0_x86.dll` to `libusb0.dll`.
You can tell that you were successful by trying to execute 'dfu-programmer' from the 'cygwin' prompt:
```
$ which dfu-programmer
/home/Kevin/local/avr/bin/dfu-programmer

$ dfu-programmer
dfu-programmer 0.7.2
https://github.com/dfu-programmer/dfu-programmer
Type 'dfu-programmer --help' for a list of commands
'dfu-programmer --targets' to list supported target devices
```

If you are not getting the above result, you will not be able to flash the firmware!
- Try making sure your `PATH` variables are set correctly for both `Windows` and `cygwin`.
- Make sure the `dll` is named correctly.
- Do not extract it with `cygwin`'s `unzip` as it does not set the executable permission. If you did it anyway, do `chmod +x dfu-programmer.exe`.
- Still have problems? Try building it instead.


##Debugging Tools

These tools are for debugging your firmware, etc. before flashing. Theoretically, it can save your memory from wearing out. However, these tool do not work 100% for the Planck firmware.

### `gdb` for AVR
`gdb` has a simulator for AVR but it does not support all instructions (like WDT), so it immediately crashes when running the Planck firmware (because `lufa.c` disables the WDT in the first few lines of execution). But it can still be useful in debugging example code and test cases, if you know how to use it.

```
$ cd ~/src
$ git clone git://sourceware.org/git/binutils-gdb.git
$ cd binutils-gdb
$ mkdir obj-avr
$ cd obj-avr
$ ../configure --prefix=$PREFIX --target=avr --build=x86_64-unknown-cygwin --with-gmp=/usr/local --with-mpfr=/usr/local --with-mpc=/usr/local --disable-nls --enable-static
$ make
$ make install
```

### `simulavr`
`simulavr` is an AVR simulator. It runs the complied AVR elfs. `simulavr` does not support the `atmega32u4` device... it does `atmega32` but that is not good enough for the firmware (no PORTE and other things), so you cannot run the Planck firmware. I use it to simulate ideas I have for features in separate test projects.

This one is a major pain in the butt because it has a lot of dependencies and it is buggy. I will do my best to explain it but... it was hard to figure out. A few things need to be changed in the 'Makefile' to make it work in `cygwin`.


```
$ cd ~/src
$ git clone https://github.com/Traumflug/simulavr.git
$ cd simulavr
$ ./bootstrap
$ ./configure --prefix=$PREFIX --enable-static --disable-tcl --disable-doxygen-doc
```
Edit `src/Makefile.am` now so that `-no-undefined` is included (I did this by removing the SYS_MINGW conditional surrounding `libsim_la_LDFLAGS += -no-undefined` and `libsimulavr_la_LDFLAGS += -no-undefined \ libsimulavr_la_LIBADD += $(TCL_LIB)`. Also, `$(EXEEXT)` is added after `kbdgentables` in two places.

```
$ make
$ make install
```


TODO:
- git repos for all sources
- command line magic for cygwin setup
- better options for `dfu-drivers`

+ 40
- 0
doc/FUSE.txt View File

@@ -0,0 +1,40 @@
ATMega168P Fuse/Lock Bits
=========================
This configuration is from usbasploader's Makefile.

HFUSE 0xD6
LFUSE 0xDF
EFUSE 0x00
LOCK 0x3F(intact)

#---------------------------------------------------------------------
# ATMega168P
#---------------------------------------------------------------------
# Fuse extended byte:
# 0x00 = 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 <-- BOOTRST (boot reset vector at 0x1800)
# \+/
# +------- BOOTSZ (00 = 2k bytes)
# Fuse high byte:
# 0xd6 = 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0
# ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ \-+-/
# | | | | | +------ BODLEVEL 0..2 (110 = 1.8 V)
# | | | | + --------- EESAVE (preserve EEPROM over chip erase)
# | | | +-------------- WDTON (if 0: watchdog always on)
# | | +---------------- SPIEN (allow serial programming)
# | +------------------ DWEN (debug wire enable)
# +-------------------- RSTDISBL (reset pin is enabled)
# Fuse low byte:
# 0xdf = 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1
# ^ ^ \ / \--+--/
# | | | +------- CKSEL 3..0 (external >8M crystal)
# | | +--------------- SUT 1..0 (crystal osc, BOD enabled)
# | +------------------ CKOUT (if 0: Clock output enabled)
# +-------------------- CKDIV8 (if 0: divide by 8)


# Lock Bits
# 0x3f = - - 1 1 1 1 1 1
# \ / \-/ \-/
# | | +----- LB 2..1 (No memory lock features enabled)
# | +--------- BLB0 2..1 (No restrictions for SPM or LPM accessing the Application section)
# +--------------- BLB1 2..1 (No restrictions for SPM or LPM accessing the Boot Loader section)

+ 321
- 0
doc/HAND_WIRE.md View File

@@ -0,0 +1,321 @@
# Quantum Hand-wiring Guide

Parts list:
* *x* keyswitches (MX, Matias, Gateron, etc)
* *x* diodes
* Keyboard plate (metal, plastic, cardboard, etc)
* Wire (strained for wiring to the Teensy, anything for the rows/columns)
* Soldering iron set at 600ºF or 315ºC (if temperature-controlled)
* Resin-cored solder (leaded or lead-free)
* Adequate ventilation/a fan
* Tweezers (optional)
* Wire cutters/snippers

## How the matrix works (why we need diodes)

The microcontroller (in this case, the Teensy 2.0) will be setup up via the firmware to send a logical 1 to the columns, one at a time, and read from the rows, all at once - this process is called matrix scanning. The matrix is a bunch of open switches that, by default, don't allow any current to pass through - the firmware will read this as no keys being pressed. As soon as you press one key down, the logical 1 that was coming from the column the keyswitch is attached to gets passed through the switch and to the corresponding row - check out the following 2x2 example:

Column 0 being scanned Column 1 being scanned
x x
col0 col1 col0 col1
| | | |
row0 ---(key0)---(key1) row0 ---(key0)---(key1)
| | | |
row1 ---(key2)---(key3) row1 ---(key2)---(key3)

The `x` represents that the column/row associated has a value of 1, or is HIGH. Here, we see that no keys are being pressed, so no rows get an `x`. For one keyswitch, keep in mind that one side of the contacts is connected to its row, and the other, its column.

When we press `key0`, `col0` gets connected to `row0`, so the values that the firmware receives for that row is `0b01` (the `0b` here means that this is a bit value, meaning all of the following digits are bits - 0 or 1 - and represent the keys in that column). We'll use this notation to show when a keyswitch has been pressed, to show that the column and row are being connected:

Column 0 being scanned Column 1 being scanned
x x
col0 col1 col0 col1
| | | |
x row0 ---(-+-0)---(key1) row0 ---(-+-0)---(key1)
| | | |
row1 ---(key2)---(key3) row1 ---(key2)---(key3)

We can now see that `row0` has an `x`, so has the value of 1. As a whole, the data the firmware receives when `key0` is pressed is

col0: 0b01
col1: 0b00
│└row0
└row1

A problem arises when you start pressing more than one key at a time. Looking at our matrix again, it should become pretty obvious:

Column 0 being scanned Column 1 being scanned
x x
col0 col1 col0 col1
| | | |
x row0 ---(-+-0)---(-+-1) x row0 ---(-+-0)---(-+-1)
| | | |
x row1 ---(key2)---(-+-3) x row1 ---(key2)---(-+-3)

Remember that this ^ is still connected to row1

The data we get from that is: